Tinnitus

What we know and what we can do to help

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Tinnitus

What we know and what we can do to help

Schedule a Consultation

Tinnitus Evaluations

A comprehensive case history and questionnaire to assess the severity of the tinnitus will be done.  We’ll use this information together with the proper testing to determine the need for referral and determine candidacy for tinnitus intervention.

Preventing Tinnitus

Anything you can do to limit your exposure to loud noise—by moving away from the sound, turning down the volume, or wearing earplugs or earmuffs—will help prevent tinnitus or keep it from getting worse.

Tinnitus Management Devices

Electronic devices that produce a soft, pleasant sound to help mask the tinnitus. Some people want the masking sound to totally cover up their tinnitus, but most prefer a masking level that is just a bit louder than their tinnitus. 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Focuses on reducing the distress and handicap induced by tinnitus. The goal is not to reduce the acoustic features of the condition, such as loudness or pitch, but to help patients who face specific difficulties.

Does Everyone with Hearing Loss Develop Tinnitus?

Why some people with hearing loss develop tinnitus—a buzzing or ringing sound in the ears in the absence of any real sound—and others don’t has puzzled scientists for years. Almost all cases of tinnitus are preceded by a loss of hearing as the result of damage to the inner ear from aging, injury, or long-term exposure to loud noise, but experts estimate that only a third of those with hearing loss will go on to develop tinnitus.

1. What is tinnitus?
Tinnitus (pronounced “tin-it-tus”) is an abnormal noise in the ear.  Tinnitus is extremely common – nearly 36 million Americans have tinnitus. More than half of the normal population has intermittent tinnitus.

About 6% of the general population has what they consider to be “severe” tinnitus. It can sound like a low roar, a high-pitched ring or a variety of other sounds.  Tinnitus may be in both ears or just in one ear.  Seven million Americans are so severely affected that they cannot lead normal lives.

2. Are there different types of tinnitus?
Types of tinnitus

There are two different categories or types of tinnitus.

Subjective tinnitus is tinnitus only you can hear. This is the most common type of tinnitus. It can be caused by ear problems in your outer, middle or inner ear. It also can be caused by problems with the hearing (auditory) nerves or the part of your brain that interprets nerve signals as sound.

Objective tinnitus (believe it or not) is tinnitus your doctor can hear when he or she does an examination. This rare type of tinnitus may be caused by a blood vessel problem, an inner ear bone condition or muscle contractions.

3. What can cause tinnitus?
There are many causes of tinnitus, here are just a few

  • Ear wax.
  • Exposure to loud noise
  • middle ear infection or fluid
  • injury to the nerve from the ear to the brain, and central nervous system damage.
  • aneurysms,
  • increased pressure in the head (hydrocephalus), and
  • hardening of the arteries.
  • Brain tumors
  • Loud noise both short term and long term. inner ear damage and tinnitus.
  • Medications
4. Who is the typical person suffering from tinnitus?
Of adults ages 65 and older in the United States, 12.3 percent of men and nearly 14 percent of women are affected by tinnitus. Tinnitus is identified more frequently in white individuals and the prevalence of tinnitus is almost twice as frequent in the South as in the Northeast.
5. Is tinnitus always heard in both ears?
Tinnitus can be perceived in both ears, one ear or in some patients in the middle of the head and not in the ear.

Tinnitus Treatments

Some people find their tinnitus doesn’t go away or it gets worse. In some cases, it may become so severe that you find it difficult to hear, concentrate, or even sleep. 

Tinnitus does not have a cure yet, but treatments that help many people cope better with the condition are available. We offer a combination of the treatments based on the severity of your tinnitus and the areas of your life it affects the most.

Treatment Options

Neuromonics

Neuromonics manufactures and distributes the only FDA-cleared, patented and clinically proven medical devices designed for long-term, significant relief of tinnitus.

Hearing Aids

Hearing aids often are helpful for people who have hearing loss along with tinnitus. Using a hearing aid adjusted to carefully control outside sound levels may make it easier for you to hear. The better you hear, the less you may notice your tinnitus.

Don't Wait Any Longer. Start Your Path to Better Hearing Today!

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Exton, PA 19341

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King of Prussia, PA 19406

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Media, PA 19063

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